Firearms Resources

Links to online firearms resources, the US Constitution Second Amendment, US data and government agencies, UN and international data, articles, supplies and organizations.

These are some resources Larry has used or investigated. This list isn’t inclusive or intended as advertising, recommendations or endorsements.

Page Contents:

General Notes

Other Online Resources

US Bill of Rights, Second Amendment

US Data & Government Agencies

UN & International Data

Articles

Supplies

Organizations

Opinion, Miscellaneous Thoughts

General Notes

  • These are links to authoritative resources for information and data related to firearms (including ownership, self defense, concealed handgun use, victimization, crime rates, mortality rates).
  • Mortality data use an international system supported by U.N. World Health Organization. ICD-10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems), categories related to firearms: W32-W34, X72-X74, X93-X95, Y22-Y24

Other Online Resources

  • Cato Institute Guns and Self Defense
  • Concealed Carry Permit Reciprocity Which states honor other states’ permits
  • Gunlaws.com Federal & state gun laws, books & links
  • GunsGunsGuns All resources about guns
  • Handgunlaw.us State gun laws, CCW info
  • Of Arms and the Law
  • Personal Defense Network Ron Pincus
  • PoliceOne’s 2013 Gun Policy & Law Enforcement Survey Results
    • Executive Summary: “Today [April 08, 2013], PoliceOne.com released the findings from last month’s Gun Policy & Law Enforcement survey, which drew more than 15,000 completed responses from verified law enforcement professionals. Covering a broad range of topics related to the gun control debate in our country, the survey found that the overall attitude of law enforcement is strongly anti-gun legislation and pro-gun rights, with the belief that an armed citizenry is effective in stopping crime.”
    • View the complete findings of the survey
  • The Police Loophole A “list of companies that have taken the step to publicly announce that they will not sell items to states, counties, cities, and municipalities that restrict their citizens rights to own them.”

US Bill of Rights, Second Amendment

  • Second Amendment text (copied from official National Archives web site): “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”
  • Opinions of the Founders relevant to firearms and the Second Amendment
  • Opinions of Presidents, Justices and elected leaders about firearms
  • Court Rulings and Legal Interpretations of Second Amendment
    • The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on 26 Jun 2008 (Disctirct of Columbia v. Heller): “The Second Amendment protects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia, and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.”
    • On 28 Jun 2010 in McDonald v. Chicago, the U.S. Supreme Court extended the reach of the Second Amendment beyond the federal government to apply also to states, counties, and cities.
    • Report of the Subcommittee on the Constitution Senate Subcommittee report, Feb 1982, “The Right to Keep and Bear Arms” — historical investigation of founders’ intent for 2nd amendment, meaning of “militia” & relevant Supreme Court decisions. 22 pages.
    • FindLaw web site Overview of relevant Supreme Court rulings.
  • General thoughts & opinions regarding Second Amendment (some items original, some borrowed from other writings)
    • Key phrase, “the right of the people to keep and bear Arms,” clearly refers to “the people” rather than governments or agencies
      • The First Amendment clearly refers to “the right of the people peaceably to assemble . . . .”
      • The Fourth Amendment refers to “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects . . . .”
      • The Tenth Amendment clearly distinguishes between the United States, the States and the people
      • The people” refers to individual citizens as well as groups of individuals, either formal or informal.
      • To claim that “the people” refers only to a group and not individuals would mean the First Amendment protects only the right of groups of people and not individuals to petition the government; no more personal letters to your Congressman. Likewise, the Fourth Amendment would only protect groups of people and not individuals from unreasonable searches and seizures.
      • Conclusion: “The people” refers to individual citizens as well as groups of citizens, never governments or agencies; to claim otherwise is to distort the very clear language of the Bill of Rights.
      • The people” (individuals as well as groups of citizens) are recipients of rights, not governments or agencies. Consider the Ninth Amendment: “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.”
      • Historical records show the phrase, “for the common defense,” was suggested but soundly rejected as a qualifier for “the right to keep and bear arms.” Such language would have severely restricted the use of private firearms, but the proposal was rejected and individual liberty was preserved.
    • Key phrase, “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State”
      • The text clearly shows relationship between Militia and State. A search of the Constitution and Bill of Rights clearly shows the word “State” (singular form) never refers to the United States or nation as a whole; rather, to one of the several states. Another search shows militias were formed by the individual states and were called upon by the federal government only for the common defense.
      • Historical records show that militias consisted of individual citizens (specifically adult white males, in most cases) who responded as needed and provided their own firearms.
      • Second Militia Act, passed 8 May 1792 by the U.S. Congress (excerpts):
        • “That each and every free able-bodied white male citizen of the respective States, resident therein, who is or shall be of age of eighteen years, and under the age of forty-five years (except as is herein after excepted) shall severally and respectively be enrolled in the militia, by the Captain or Commanding Officer of the company, within whose bounds such citizen shall reside, and that within twelve months after the passing of this Act.”
        • “That every citizen, so enrolled and notified, shall, within six months thereafter, provide himself with a good musket or firelock, a sufficient bayonet and belt, two spare flints, and a knapsack, a pouch, with a box therein, to contain not less than twenty four cartridges, suited to the bore of his musket or firelock, each cartridge to contain a proper quantity of power and ball; or with a good rifle, knapsack, shot-pouch, and power-horn, twenty balls suited to the bore of his rifle, and a quarter of a power [sic] of power; and shall appear so armed, accoutred and provided, when called out to exercise or into service, except, that when called out on company days to exercise only, he may appear without a knapsack.”
      • Op/Ed, Richmond Times-Dispatch, 27 Nov 2007 (“Listen to Reason: The Bill of Rights Is a Package Deal”): “But historical evidence shows the militia was, and still is, nearly the whole of the adult populace. (Even D.C.’s own militia ordinance reads that way.) Now consider a parallel construction — the statement, ‘A well-fed marching band being necessary to the amusement of a free state, the right of the people to grow and eat crops shall not be infringed.’ Gun-control advocates would say that sentence means only the marching band can grow food. But that is clearly not what it means.”
      • Even if the Second Amendment were only to allow the establishment of militias, the wording still supports private ownership of arms.
    • Key word, “keep”
      • This refers to ownership and in no way implies a collective right, as in state or private militias.
    • Does changing technology make the Second Amendment obsolete?
      • The citizens who fought the occupying British forces used their personal weapons, the latest technology of the day and equivalent to that of the occupying soldiers’ muskets.
      • Does changing technology (radio, TV, satellites, cell phones, the Internet) make the rest of the Bill of Rights obsolete?
      • Or does changing technology simply affect the way individuals practice their rights as guaranteed in the Bill of Rights and elsewhere in the Constitution?

US Data & Government Agencies

  • “How You Will Die — Lifetime Risk”. Source: National Safety Council, Injury Facts 2011; quoted by Discover Magazine, July/August 2011 (emphasis added)
    • shark attack: 1 in 3,943,110
    • fireworks: 1 in 386,766
    • flood: 1 in 175,803
    • earthquake or other earth movement: 1 in 148,756
    • dog attack: 1 in 120,864
    • legal execution: 1 in 96,691
    • bee, hornet, or wasp sting: 1 in 71,623
    • cataclysmic storm: 1 in 46,044
    • heat exposure: 1 in 12,517
    • electrocution: 1 in 9,943
    • air transport accident: 1 in 7,032
    • firearm discharge: 1 in 6,309
    • pedalcyclist accident: 1 in 4,717
    • fire: 1 in 1,177
    • accidental drowning: 1 in 1,123
    • motorcycle accident: 1 in 770
    • pedestrian accident: 1 in 649
    • assault by firearm: 1 in 306
    • car occupant accident: 1 in 303
    • fall: 1 in 171
    • accidental poisoning by, or exposure to, noxious substance: 1 in 130
    • intentional self-harm: 1 in 112
    • motor vehicle accident: 1 in 88
    • stroke: 1 in 28
    • cancer: 1 in 7
    • heart disease: 1 in 6
  • Department of Justice
  • ATF Statistics
  • CDC, National Center for Health Statistics, Data Warehouse
  • NRA

UN & International Data

Articles

Organizations

  • GOA Gun Owners of America
  • NRA National Rifle Association
  • NRA-ILA NRA Institute for Legislative Action
  • USCCA U.S. Concealed Carry Association

Opinion, Miscellaneous Thoughts

  • “What’s in a heart can’t be controlled by restricting what’s in a hand.” — Cal Thomas, “Control Politicians, Not Guns” 15 Jan 2013
  • Zero tolerance for firearms
    • Why not zero tolerance for automobiles? Compare mortality rates due to firearms (1 in 306) and vehicular accidents (1 in 88). We could reduce the national speed limit to 35 mph to reduce deaths and save fuel, but virtually no one would find this acceptable. Our unwillingness to eliminate everything that might kill someone shows the issue really is not loss of a single life as much as it is personal preferences. Some people don’t like guns, so they wish to eliminate them for everyone. There are things I do not tolerate, but would you be willing to live your life by my preferences? No? Then please do not ask me to live mine by yours.
  • Gun control
    • Under gun control laws, law-abiding citizens become helpless victims.
    • “Gun control defined: The theory that people who are willing to ignore laws against rape, torture, kidnapping, theft and murder will obey a law which prohibits them from owning a firearm.” — Unknown
    • Criminals don’t obey gun control laws.
    • Gun control is about control, not guns.
    • Where have gun laws reduced crime?
    • Punish criminals, not gun owners.
    • The best gun control is getting your gun back on target quickly.
  • Self defense
    • “Any law that makes self defense illegal or impractical is an illegitimate law, because such a law ultimately subjects people to the criminal element.” (Larry Pratt, Gun Owners of America)
    • Self defense is both a right and a responsibility.
    • When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.
    • You can try to eliminate guns, but you’ll never eliminate evil, so don’t reduce my ability to protect my loved ones from evil.
  • Those who prefer Australia or England’s gun control and higher crime rates are free to emigrate. Don’t try to duplicate their failed systems here.
  • N.Y. Mayor Bloomberg should be arrested along with the people he hired to break the law making straw purchases of firearms.
  • If guns cause crime, then keyboards cause misspelled words, cars cause DUIs, matches cause arson, and kitchen utensils cause obesity.
  • I don’t shoot to kill; I shoot to save life.
  • Assault is a behavior, not a device.
  • Free people can own and use guns; subjects and slaves cannot.
  • Fight crime: shoot back.
  • A firearm in the hands of a law-abiding citizen is a threat to no one except bad guys.

3 Responses to Firearms Resources

  • Leanne says:

    Thank you for your webpage. My husband, a group of our friends, and myself are trying to start a hunting club in our area. I wanted to put together a resource list to help us all get started. Your page had some great gun resources for this. Thanks so much for sharing!

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